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Saturday, April 21, 2018 • 10 AM to 2 PMCelebrate Communication

LOCATION:  Northern Virginia Community College • Ernst Community Cultural Center/Gymnasium • 8333 Little River Turnpike, Annandale, VA

Celebrate Communication is the area's premier information fair for anyone with an interest in or connection to hearing loss.

Last year we had over 40 vendors will be offering free information on a wide variety of resources including State and local government programs, cutting edge technology for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, ASL and Cued Speech, hearing dogs, and many more.

 Global Deaf Muslim (GDM) presents...

This session will guide participants to become a successful ASL interpreter in Muslim settings.  Participants will gain knowledge and understanding with the language and customs involved.  They will learn about Islamic signs and what to expect from interpreting for Islamic events. DOWNLOAD flyer

April 08, 2017
9:30 - 11:30 AM
Gallaudet University, 800 Florida Ave NE
Washington, DC  20002
Room: SAC 1010
Cost $20 - CEUs: 0.2

To register, visit:  https://gdmworkshop.eventbrite.com

January 28, 2017 Saturday
Time: 12 Noon

Northern Virginia Resource Center (NVRC)
3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, 
Fairfax, VA 22030

EDB will provide ham.  

Please follow  your last name A-Z.
A - F: Desserts
G - L: Appetizers
M - S: Cold Salads
T - Z: Hot Dishes

Please inform Darrell Dall at president@EasternDeafBikers.org what dish(es) you will bring to prevent duplicates and the number of people coming to the party.

After the Holiday Party, there will be a meeting. According to EDB bylaws, we are required to have a membership meeting twice a year.

DOWNLOAD - Eastern_Deaf_Bikers_Flyer

 

NVRC_logoSM


Saturday, April 22, 2017 • 10 AM to 2 PM

LOCATION:  Northern Virginia Community College • Ernst Community Cultural Center/Gymnasium • 8333 Little River Turnpike, Annandale, VA

Celebrate Communication is the area's premier information fair for anyone with an interest in or connection to hearing loss.

Last year we had over 40 vendors will be offering free information on a wide variety of resources including State and local government programs, cutting edge technology for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, ASL and Cued Speech, hearing dogs, and many more.

READ ABOUT - Rehoboth Beach Vacation Raffle

Share the CELEBRATE COMMUNICATION 2017 Flyer 

Click on one of the following to learn more.

CC Info 2017 Sponsor-Exhibitor directions
vddhh_web Virginia Relay

 

 

WMAR Baltimore
By WMAR Staff
Nov 16, 2016

Music isn't just for people who can hear. Wendy Cheng has proved that. She's deaf -- but plays the viola.

Cheng was invited to play with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Wednesday night in an event called the Rusty Musicians. It was a chance for ordinary music lovers to play Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 with professionals.

"I chose to do this with the BSO because I love that movement very much," Cheng said. "The idea of playing it with a real orchestra was just too irresistible for me to pass up. Even though I have a hearing loss; I keep thinking, Beethoven would approve."

Cheng, founder of the Association of Adult Musicians with Hearing Loss, has always been a musician. She lost her hearing after a bad fever when she was 2 years old. She started playing the piano at age seven and later began playing violin in college.

Read more  . . . See captioned video

 

Federal law requires that law enforcement agencies must provide the communication aids and services needed to communicate effectively with people who are deaf

PoliceOne.com
Nov. 8, 2016
by  Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, almost one in 10 people in the U.S. could benefit from hearing aids. About two percent of adults aged 45 to 54 have disabling hearing loss. The rate increases to 8.5 percent for adults aged 55 to 64, to 25 percent of those aged 65 to 74, and 50 percent of those who are 75 and older.

Police interactions with deaf subjects are fraught with the possibility that one side or the other — and possibly both — misunderstanding the person in front of them. It is uncommon for law enforcement officers to know American Sign Language, and there is woefully little instruction done in our schools about how individuals — deaf or otherwise — should respond to the lawful commands of police officers.

Read more . . . Police

 

 

Washington Post - Local

October 11

WASHINGTON — Police departments across the country have recently put extra emphasis on their community policing efforts, working to improve relations with the black community and other minority groups.

In the same way, in Washington, a special Metropolitan Police Department unit has been working for more than a decade to build trust with another local community.

The Metropolitan Police Department’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing Liaison Unit is the only such unit in the country. The unit’s two officers — Myra Jordan and Tayna Ellis — both learned sign language outside MPD.

“We are on call 24 hours, seven days a week,” said Ellis.

“And it’s not work to us because it’s something we truly, truly enjoy doing,” Jordan said.

Jordan helped create the unit nearly 15 years ago. Since then, it’s become a major resource for the local deaf community.

Last year alone, the unit responded to more than 300 calls for service.

Shayninna McCoy, a specialist with the local advocacy group Deaf Reach, said, “The deaf community feels confident that their communication will be understood by the police.”

The Washington region is said to be home to the highest concentration of deaf people in the world. Many attend Gallaudet University then stay here for their careers.

Read more  . . . Deaf and Hard of Hearing Liaison Unit 

Read More  . . . MPDC Related Links:

Deaf & Hard Of Hearing Liaison Unit
http://mpdc.dc.gov/page/deaf-and-hard-hearing-liaison-unit

Meet Officers Ellis and Jordan MPDS
http://mpdc.dc.gov/release/meet-officers-ellis-and-jordan-mpds-deaf-and-hard-hearing-liaison-unit

Communication Rights Deaf or Hard of Hearing
http://mpdc.dc.gov/page/communication-rights-deaf-or-hard-hearing

PDF Brochure Download - http://mpdc.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/mpdc/publication/attachments/DHHU%20Brochure%202014.pdf

NBC4 TV coverage Oct. 7th
NBC 4 Story & un-captioned Video

 

 

deafvotelogo2016

This Website has been set up especially for Deaf citizens—specifically, those who may never have voted before but are curious about the Presidential campaign and the parties’ positions on issues that concern Deaf people. It’s for anyone would like to know how to register to vote.

LINK to DeafVote.com

 

 

Dear NVAD members and friends,

There will be a state wide rally conducted by Deaf Grassroots Movement-Virginia in 7 cities on Thursday, October 20, from 10 am to 2 pm. DGM-VA chose Fairfax to represent Northern Virginia. Timothy Lavelle is willing to take the lead for the Fairfax rally which will be held at the City Hall in the city of Fairfax between Rt 123 and University Blvd and will need volunteers to march and make noises. We will need to make some signs. The main focus is "Deaf Equal Access Now". Please take the time to read the letter and look at all three attachments from Deborah McKague who is the secretary of DGM-VA and an activist. Please share this (forward with attachments) with your friends and organizations.
 
Tim can be reached at 571-350-8029 VP, FT or Glide.
Thank you very much,
Jeanne Lavelle

 

 

Come join us to learn about the ABCs of Medicare! Learn about Low Income Subsidy Programs! Learn how to Protect Yourself from Medicare Fraud!

JulieAnn Chavez Medicare Benefits Specialist

DATE: Saturday, October 1, 2016 10:00AM to 12:00PM
PLACE: Northern Virginia Resource Center (NVRC) 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130 Fairfax, VA 22030

For more information, contact NVAD President Donna Graff-Viall: 571-766-0671 (VP) or missgraffie@gmail.com (email)

DOWNLOAD - nvad-workshop_saturday-october-1-2016

 

 

Outreach Services, VSDB Wednesday Webinar
Sept. 28, 2016, 4:00- 5:00 PM EDT

Working Memory, Part II: Strategies for Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
Presenter:Johnett Scogin, M.Ed. 

Please register for Working Memory, Part II: Strategies for Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6728744357838753538

Presenter:  Johnett Scogin has worked in the field of Deaf Education for many years as a teacher and reading specialist.   She is currently working at the Texas School for the Deaf as Supervisor of Curriculum.

No prerequisites for this webinar: This webinar follows the Spring, 2016 webinar in which Dr. Daniel Koo of Gallaudet University presented his research on working memory of children who are deaf or hard of hearing.  Attendance at Dr. Koo’s webinar is not a prerequisite for this webinar.

Webinar Description:  Evidence suggests that challenged working memory skills create a high risk factor for educational underachievement, and that working memory impacts all areas of learning and thinking.  Ms. Scogin will briefly review the function of working memory in daily life and academics, and discuss how one might identify children with challenges in this area.  She will then share ideas for setting up the learning environment to support working memory, and strategies to help facilitate and accommodate working memory performance.

Target Audience: Teachers and related service providers working with students who are deaf or hard of hearing; family members.

This Webinar is sponsored by Outreach Services, Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind in Staunton, through grant funding from the Virginia Department of Education.  Questions should be directed to Dr. Debbie Pfeiffer at : Debbie.pfeiffer@vsdb.k12.va.us

After registering, you will receive an email confirmation with connection information for joining the webinar.

 

Register now under the Early Bird rate until September 16!

Join us for Erev Rosh Hashanah Dinner hosted
by Hillel at Gallaudet!
Open to students, faculty, staff,
and the WSJD Community
$ 25.00 per person
$ 36.00 per adult per holiday service.
One price for two Rosh Hashanah services.
One price for Yom Kippur service and break fast.

To learn more and to register for as many events, click here.
SERVICE SCHEDULE
Erev Rosh Hashanah
Sunday, October 2
Gallaudet University - Foster Auditorium

Dinner: 5:00 p.m.    Service: 7:15 p.m.

Rosh Hashanah Morning Service, 

Luncheon and Discussion Session
Adat Shalom Reconstructionist Congregation

Monday, October 3, 10:00 a.m.

Yom Kippur Service and Break Fast
Adat Shalom Reconstructionist Congregation

Wednesday, October 12, 5:30 p.m.

COME AND JOIN US...
If you want to participate in the ASL High Holy Day services,
click here to fill out the survey.
Washington Society of Jewish Deaf | wsjd01@gmail.com |www.wsjdeaf.org

 

by Inside Edition
August 24, 2016

The recent fatal shooting of a deaf driver by a police officer in North Carolina has raised questions about safety for hearing impaired motorists.

Jennifer Labriola, the principal of the New York School for the Deaf who drives to work each day, told Inside Edition through a sign language interpreter that if a hearing impaired driver is pulled over, "you tell the police officer you're deaf and 'I need to write this down.' You point to your ear.”

She added: “It's important to wait for your instructions and not do anything. Just wait and see. When they ask for my license and registration, at that point, I would take out the items asked for.”

Read The Article
( To Watch Captioned Video Scroll down)

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Watch Captioned Video
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Related Information to Keep you Safe
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Virginia Visor Card
 Visor Card Information
The NVRC Office has these cards available

 

Classic FM
The worlds Greatest Music
By Rob Weinberg,
17th August 2016

Ludwig was still pumping out the masterpieces - even when he was completely deaf. Here's how he did it.

"For the last three years my hearing has grown steadily weaker..." - so wrote Beethoven, aged 30, in a letter to a friend.

The young Beethoven was known as the most important musician since Mozart. By his mid-20s, he had studied with Haydn and was celebrated as a brilliant, virtuoso pianist.

Beethoven's life timeline: 1770 - 1802 >

By the time he turned 30 he had composed a couple of piano concertos, six string quartets, and his first symphony. Everything was looking pretty good for the guy, with the prospect of a long, successful career ahead.

Then, he started to notice a buzzing sound in his ears  . . .

Read more  . . . Beethoven