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We are seeking referrals of individuals to participate in an important study that The MITRE Corporation, a not-for-profit organization, is conducting to assess current Internet Protocol (IP) based Captioned Telephone Services (IP CTS) and similar mobile telephone applications. IP CTS allows a person with hearing loss to speak and listen to another party while simultaneously reading captions of what the other party is saying.

We would greatly appreciate your contribution to this important research effort.  Here are three ways you can help:

  • Identify potential participant(s)
  • Share this request with your network, or
  • Sign-up yourself.

This study will assess the caption phone services, desktop telephones, and mobile devices from the user’s perspective. Data collected will include caption service performance and usability feedback from users. This information will help to determine the minimum requirements for caption phone services. Participants will be compensated for their time up to $100 for a two-hour assessment.

To participate in the assessment, one must meet the following requirements:

  • Be hard of hearing or have a hearing loss which requires the use of captioning services
  • S. Citizen
  • 21 years or older
  • Be able to participate in the assessment for up to 2 hours between March-July of 2017 at MITRE’s office in McLean, Virginia

Please forward this request to individuals who are hard of hearing, and support organizations who might propose qualified candidates for this important assessment.

You can contact us via email at CaptionServices@mitre.org

Thank you for your time, consideration, and support!

Jen McLachlan
The MITRE Corporation

MITRE operates multiple federally funded research and development centers (FFRDCs).  MITRE partners with sponsors to provide innovative practical solutions for some of our nation’s most critical challenges in healthcare, defense and intelligence, aviation, civil systems, homeland security, the judiciary, and cybersecurity.

 

Transition from TTY to Real-Time Text Technology

NVRC Board Members Tom Dowling, Gary Viall, and Alexa Schriempf, and staff member Debbie Jones attended this morning's FCC Open Meeting   There was a great turn out of Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Deaf-Blind and Speech Disability consumer organizations!  There were representatives from Gallaudet University, TDI, HLAA, and NAD, to name just a few.

The first item on the agenda for this morning's meeting was the Transition from TTY to Real-Time Text Technology:

The Commission will consider a Report and Order and Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to help achieve the transition from TTY technology to a reliable and interoperable means of providing real-time text communication over wireless Internet protocol-enabled networks and services.

 

Real-Time Text Technology (RTT) would replace the old TTY technology for communication over telephone lines and wireless systems, providing real-time, as you type it, text communications for Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Deaf-Blind and Speech Disabled consumers.  RTT would be flexible to work on all internet protocol systems and devices, as well as being retro compatible with older TTY devices, until they phase out.  It would also be compatible with 911 systems for emergency calls.

The FCC heard the report  on Real-Time Text Technology, as well as remarks from Bobbi Cordano, President of Gallaudet University. The Commissioners voted to adopt the Order and Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

This means that, moving forward, industries will not limited to making devices compatible with the old TTY technology, and can focus on making RTT interoperable across all devices and IP networks.

(See attached press release)

DOWNLOAD (PDF) - FCC Press Release DOC-342624A1

See pictures of meeting on facebook

 

 

Join the disAbility Resource Center as it Celebrates the Holidays at its 16th Annual Open House

Wednesday, December 7, 2016
2 p.m. to 6 p.m.
409 Progress St., Fredericksburg, VA  22401

At 4 p.m. we will provide recognition and appreciation of Arva Priola who is retiring after more than 20 years of service to the  dRC
and the Deaf and Hard of Hearing community.

R.S.V. P.: 540-373-2559 or drc@cildrc.org

 

 

When? December 1, 12-1:30 p.m.

Where? 2300 Clarendon Blvd. Suite 305 Arlington, VA 

RSVPexcel@ecnv.org or 703-525-3268, please let us know of any accommodation needs.

One of the best pathways to gaining meaningful employment is through volunteering, as it can help enhance your personal skill-set, make new contacts, build your network, gain in-debt knowledge about a specific career, and strengthen your resume.

So stop by ECNV on December 1, 2016 at 12 p.m. for an interactive employment workshop presented by Angela Saiza Starling of Volunteer Fairfax, where she will discuss how her organization can match you with your ideal volunteering position.
This presentation will cover:

  • What is a volunteer center?
  • Pathways to employment
  • Ways to engage
  • Trivia

Volunteer Fairfax, has been building better community through service for more than 40 years. They are the regional volunteer center serving Fairfax County and the National Capital region. They seek individuals, families, youth and corporate groups for service opportunities at a variety of nonprofit agencies. One-time special events or ongoing activities are available. In 2015, through various program and events, the organization engaged more than 23,000 volunteers who served nearly 83,000 donated hours. For more information, visit www.volunteerfairfax.org

 

 

The Huffington Post
THE BLOG
by Janice S. Lintz
Consultant, Consumer Advocate, Foodie and Traveler

The Smithsonian Institution should be ashamed for failing to include hearing induction loops for its videos and films, for people who are hard of hearing, in the new National Museum of African American History and Culture. Twenty-six years after the enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, none of the Smithsonian museums provides hearing induction loops for videos or films. Some of the museums offer loops at the service desks.

Read more  . . . Smithsonian

 

 

National Council on Disability Calls for a “Technology Bill of Rights” for 57 Million Americans

Go to Original Page Content

Posted: October 7

Washington, DC – Today, the National Council on Disability (NCD)—an independent federal agency—calls on Congress to establish a Technology Bill of Rights for Americans with Disabilities in its annual report to Congress and the President outlining the state of the union for 57 million Americans with disabilities.

NCD’s 2016 annual report, “National Disability Policy: A Progress Report,” identifies access to information and communications innovations as a civil rights issue due to the power technology has to transform civic engagement and economic opportunity in the United States.

NCD will release the report this morning in connection with a Capitol Hill briefing on the report this morning at 11:00 AM at the Washington, DC’s Capitol Visitor Center. The briefing panel features technology industry leaders from Microsoft and IBM, as well as disability advocates and federal partners.

“Accessible technology is not limited to what we can conceive of today. It also sets the stage for what we will achieve tomorrow,” said Clyde Terry, NCD Chair. “Regulations, legal frameworks and professional standards are important foundations, but they begin a process, they don’t end it. In today’s world, technological equality for persons with disabilities is a social justice issue. To be truly accessible, technological inclusion must be built in, from the ground up, with every user in mind.  Anything else is a step backwards. Anything less creates second class citizens.”

A full report may be downloaded from NCD’s website at www.ncd.gov/progress_reports.

 

 

On September 29, 2016, the FCC adopted rules to update and strengthen Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA), which are alerts that are sent to wireless phones.  The updated rules are intended to promote the wider use and effectiveness of WEA and to make such messages more accessible for individuals with disabilities.

Highlights of the updated rules include: 

  • Increase the maximum length of WEA messages (from 90 to 360 characters) for 4G LTE and future networks;
  • Require participating wireless providers to support inclusion of embedded phone numbers and URLs in all WEA alerts;
  • Require participating wireless providers to deliver the alerts to more specifically targeted geographic areas to avoid “over-alerting”;
  • Create a new class of alerts (“Public Safety Messages”) to convey essential, recommended actions that can save lives or property (e.g. emergency shelter locations or a boil water order);
  • Require participating wireless providers to support transmission of Spanish-language alerts; and
  • Make it easier for state and local authorities to test WEA, train personnel, and raise public awareness about the service.

    The FCC also released a Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (FNPRM) to invite public comment on:

 

 

 

 

Dear NVAD members and friends,

There will be a state wide rally conducted by Deaf Grassroots Movement-Virginia in 7 cities on Thursday, October 20, from 10 am to 2 pm. DGM-VA chose Fairfax to represent Northern Virginia. Timothy Lavelle is willing to take the lead for the Fairfax rally which will be held at the City Hall in the city of Fairfax between Rt 123 and University Blvd and will need volunteers to march and make noises. We will need to make some signs. The main focus is "Deaf Equal Access Now". Please take the time to read the letter and look at all three attachments from Deborah McKague who is the secretary of DGM-VA and an activist. Please share this (forward with attachments) with your friends and organizations.
 
Tim can be reached at 571-350-8029 VP, FT or Glide.
Thank you very much,
Jeanne Lavelle

 

 

THE BETTER HEARING CONSUMER
By Gael Hannan

In the hearing loss world that I live in, there are HoHs and there are Pros:

HoH: Refers to a person who has hearing loss and who may also identify as hard of hearing, hearing-impaired, or hearing aid/cochlear implant user. (This term does not refer to all those affected by a person’s hearing loss, such as the moms and dads, life partners, children, and friends.)

Pro:  Refers to someone who works in a hearing healthcare field, such as an audiologist or hearing instrument specialist, but this category also can include an Ear, Nose & Throat doctor, hearing aid manufacturer, and/or an assistive technology sales rep.

…now that we’ve got that out of the way…

If you’re a HoH, you have most likely—hopefully—met a Pro by now. You made an appointment, walked through that door and sat down to discuss your hearing with this Pro.

Read more  . . . . HOH-PRO

 

We currently have an exciting career opportunity available to work as our Older Adult Specialist. Position location is flexible nationally. The Older Adult Program Specialist provides, provide consultation, technical assistance, training, advocacy, resource materials and program development on behalf of senior adults, ages 55 and better, who are experiencing combined loss of vision and hearing on a national basis.

DOWNLOAD - position-announcement_-older-adult-specialist

Submit resume to:                       

FAX:                (516) 767-2302
E-mail:            hkncrecruitment@hknc.org
Mail to:            Helen Keller National Center
141 Middle Neck Road
Sands Point, New York 11050
Attn: Human Resources Department
Job Code – OAP

The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) recently released the annual data for its ongoing study on the cost of workplace accommodations, revealing that the majority (59 percent) of workplace accommodations cost nothing, while for those that do, the typical small expenditure pays for itself multiple-fold in the form of reduced insurance and training costs and increased productivity and morale. JAN, which like EARN is a service of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, has reported the Workplace Accommodations: Low Cost, High Impact study each year since 2004.

Thanks to Access Fairfax: News and Events for People with Disabilities

 

 

There’s a “golden hour” after a vehicle crash or emergency.

Medical help may be required, but first responders need to know what medical conditions people might have, especially if they are unconscious or unable to talk.

The Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department’s new “Yellow Dot Program” could save your life, and enrollment is simple:

  1. Visit your local fire station for a kit.
  2. Fill out the booklet in pencil (so you can make future updates).
  3. Attach a current photo into the booklet.
  4. Place the booklet in your glove compartment.
  5. Place the yellow dot decal in the lower left of your rear windshield to alert first responders to check the glove compartment for vital medical information. Tip: place the sticker no higher than three inches from the bottom.

 

The Technology Access Program (TAP) at Gallaudet University is conducting a brief online survey to learn about the types of alerting devices deaf and hard of hearing people might prefer to notify them to common sounds around the home (doorbell ringing, videophone call, baby crying, etc.), and emergency alerts (fire alarms, emergency weather alerts, etc.). Your responses to this short survey will help us in the development of better notification options for these common sounds and emergency alerts.

To take this survey you must be 18 years or older.

The Gallaudet Institutional Review Board has approved this study. If you have any questions about the study, please contact Christian Vogler Christian.vogler@gallaudet.edu or Paula Tucker paula.tucker@gallaudet.edu.

Please click http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/2997929/Home-alerting-devices-Internet-Version to begin the survey.

The survey will close on October 31, 2016.

 

 

The university will have to remove free online content that doesn't meet the standards of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Harrison Bergeron should enroll at the University of California-Berkeley. The federal Department of Justice recently informed the university that the online content it makes available to the public free of charge runs afoul of the Americans with Disabilities Act—blind and deaf people wouldn't be able to access it, according to the government.

In response, Berkeley is considering simply removing the online resources, since that's much cheaper than becoming ADA compliant.

You might say, well, Berkeley is a public university, and has a responsibility to make its resources available to all students, regardless of their disability status. That's true. But here's the thing: no Berkeley student has complained. The online courses have proven to be perfectly accessible to the entire student body thus far.

Read more . . . DOJ - ADA